Summer 2017

HOT DOCS

The real world provides the inspiration for some fascinating documentaries at the cinema this summer.

Whitney: Can I Be Me (Dogwoof)

From acclaimed director Nick Broomfield comes a new film about one of the greatest singers of all time. Whitney Houston was the epitome of superstar, an "American Princess", the most awarded female artist ever. Even though Whitney had made millions of dollars, had more consecutive number ones than The Beatles, and became recognized as having one of the greatest voices of all time, she still wasn’t free to be herself and died at just 48 years old. Made with largely never-seen before footage and exclusive live recordings, Whitney 'Can I Be Me' tells Whitney Houston’s incredible and poignant life story with insights from those closest to her.

In Cinemas Now

Book Tickets

Kedi (Icon)

Hundreds of thousands of Turkish cats roam the metropolis of Istanbul freely. For thousands of years they've wandered in and out of people's lives, becoming an essential part of the communities that make the city so rich. Claiming no owners, the cats of Istanbul live between two worlds, neither wild nor tame — and they bring joy and purpose to those people they choose to adopt. In Istanbul, cats are the mirrors to the people, allowing them to reflect on their lives in ways nothing else could. Critics and internet cats agree — this cat documentary will charm its way into your heart and home as you fall in love with the cats in Istanbul.  

In Cinemas Now

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David Lynch: The Art Life (Thunderbird)

“David Lynch: The Art Life” an intimate portrait of a master director, screenwriter and producer. Known for cult classics The Elephant Man (1980) Blue Velvet (1986) and Mulholland Drive (2001) and with a revival series of mystery-horror Twin Peaks (1990-1991, 2017) on the way, David Lynch is one of the most prolific filmmakers working in the industry today. The formative years of his life are explored in unprecedented depth, from his idyllic upbringing in small town America, to the dark streets of Philadelphia, recounting the events that helped shape one of cinema’s most enigmatic and revered directors. Narrated by Lynch himself, the documentary infuses his art, music and films in striking fashion, shining a light into his unique world, and offering audiences a greater understanding of the artist, as well as the man. 

In Cinemas Now

Book Tickets

City of Ghosts (Dogwoof)

A real-life international thriller, “City of Ghosts” exposes a new type of warfare: a battle over ideas, a fight for hearts and minds, a conflict over clicks and views. Captivating in its immediacy, it follows the journey of “Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently”—a handful of anonymous activists who banded together after their homeland was taken over by ISIS in 2014. With astonishing, deeply personal access, this is the story of a brave group of citizen journalists as they face the realities of life undercover, on the run, and in exile, risking their lives to stand up against one of the greatest evils in the world today.   

In Cinemas Now

Book Tickets

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power (Paramount)

Climate Changes, Truth Doesn’t. A decade after “An Inconvenient Truth” brought climate change into the heart of popular culture, comes the riveting and rousing follow-up that shows just how close we are to a real energy revolution. Vice President Al Gore continues his tireless fight traveling around the world training an army of climate champions and influencing international climate policy. Cameras follow him behind the scenes – in moments both private and public, funny and poignant -- as he pursues the inspirational idea that while the stakes have never been higher, the perils of climate change can be overcome with human ingenuity and passion. 

See it in cinemas from Aug 12th

Quest (Dogwoof)

This intimate chronicle of an African-American family in Philadelphia spans eight years, beginning at the dawn of the Obama presidency. Parents Christopher "Quest" Rainey, and Christine’a "Ma Quest” Rainey navigate the hardship and strife that grips their North Philly neighborhood as they raise their children, and cultivate a creative sanctuary for their community in their home music studio. This tender portrait of the Rainey family is both a vivid illumination of race, class and life in modern day America, and an inspirational testament to love, healing and hope. 

See it in cinemas from Aug 18th